Our school districts must not tolerate cyber bullies

“Freedom of speech crosses the line when a threat of violence is made. No more tweets on the subject.”

That says it all.

Know if your kids are making threats against others online. If they are, they can be held accountable and suffer punishment for their writings… PC Pandora computer monitoring software lets you know what your kids are doing and saying on the Internet…

November 28, 2012
Our Voice: Our school districts must not tolerate cyber bullies
Written by the Desert Sun Editorial Board

Students in California public schools have the inalienable right to attend classes on school campuses that are safe, secure and peaceful. A new state law designed to give school districts guidance on how to prevent bullying through social media aims to fulfill that promise.

Palm Springs Unified and Desert Sands Unified have begun to refine their rules to comply. Stopping bullies — especially “cyber bullies” — is an important mission for our schools. Sending text messages or tweets or posting on Facebook can spread hateful speech quickly, much faster than the old verbal rumor mill.

Palm Springs has developed a flow chart to help administrators decide when to intervene and when to discipline a student. It can be a tough judgment call.

For instance, a Cathedral City High School student was suspended for suggesting on Twitter that football players start a fight in a game against Palm Springs High to prevent the Indians from making the playoffs. It was a reference to Palm Desert High having to forfeit a game against Cathedral City because so many Aztecs were suspended the week before.

Several students objected to the suspension with tweets that said it was just a joke and that it should be treated as free speech.

Principal Guillermo Chavez responded decisively and correctly with his own tweet: “Freedom of speech crosses the line when a threat of violence is made. No more tweets on the subject.” CONTINUE READING›


Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.